Christianity and theology

He Abhors Not the Virgin’s Womb

The second hymn on the list is “O Come, All Ye Faithful.” Originally written in Latin by Francis Wadde (1711-1786) but translated into English by Frederick Oakley and William Brooke in 1841. The second verse of the carol goes:

God of God, Light of Light

Lo, he abhors not the Virgin’s womb:

Very God, begotten, not made

Have you ever wondered how it was like for God to freely choose to humble himself and become a baby in a womb? The all-powerful God becoming a helpless baby who is fully dependent on her mother. How incomprehensible this is! Little wonder then that Francis could not also help but marvel as well and say, “See he does not despise his state of being a baby in Mary’s womb.”

Probably, Francis had Philippians 2:6, 7 in mind as he wrote down these lyrics: “Who (Christ), though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men.”

Christmas is a really wonder, but it is not a wonder that leaves us confused. Instead, it fills us with gratitude and adoration. So, O, come all you who believe in Christ and let’s us adore him. Adore him not only on December 25 but all the days of our lives.

Standard
Christianity and theology

…Far as the Curse is Found

It’s Christmas season once again, and the airwaves are filled Christmas hymns and carols. Although not all these hymns and carols are sound, there are some that have deep and sound theological truths. As we approach Christmas I would like us to take some time to reflect on these songs.

The first hymn on the list is Joy to the World which was composed and written by Isaac Watts in the 18th Century and is based on Psalm 98. The third verse goes:

No more let sins and sorrows grow,

nor thorns infest the ground;

he comes to make his blessings flow

far as the curse is found,

far as the curse is found,

far as the curse is found.

What a wonderful truth we have in these lyrics. When sin entered the world through Adam, it brought a curse on human race and the rest of creation (Gen. 3:14-19; Rom. 8:19-22). However, Christ came to reverse the curse so that man could be reconciled with God. He redeemed us from the curse by becoming a curse himself on our behalf (Gal. 3: 13).

Now through him, the curse is removed and we enjoy all heavenly blessings in him (Gal. 3:14; Eph. 1:3). This is why Watts declares that Christ came to make his blessings flow far as the curse is found. In Christ, all those who were once cursed are declared righteous and there is no single part in their life that remains under a curse, for they become a new creation in him.

Oh, what a great message of joy we need to carry to the whole world.

Standard