Christianity and Society

A Lament: Why I feel betrayed by my fellow Christians who support disparaging remarks of Africa and Africans

About a week ago, the President of United States of America, Donald Trump allegedly used vulgar language to disparage the country of Haiti and the continent of Africa. The president has since denied using vulgar language but admitted to have spoken tough on the issue of illegal immigration in the USA.

Ever since the news was reported in the media, there have been two main reactions. Some have condemned what the president said while others have supported what the president said. However, what has greatly disheartened me is to hear fellow Christians categorically supporting the degrading language that the president allegedly used to describe a continent that is a home to many of their brothers and sisters in Christ. When I read and heard some of the comments I felt like David in Psalm 41:9: “Even my close friend in whom I trusted…has lifted his heel against me.

Now, before I proceed to bemoan what I strongly feel as betrayal I need to highlight the following: first, I strongly believe that the USA just like any other country in the world has a right to decide who enters and stays within its boarders. This is absolutely right. It is only wrong if the USA chooses basing on skin color or the conditions of where one comes from. Secondly, I also strongly agree with the USA government that illegal immigration is wrong. When somebody enters the USA, they agree to stay in the country as long as they are permitted by their visa or other immigration documents. It is sinful and wrong to overstay.

That said, I feel let down by fellow Christians who have unconditionally supported what the president of USA said regarding the continent of Africa where I come from for the following reasons: first as I have already highlighted above, your fellow brothers and sisters live in this continent. It is just normal and human to feel hurt when one demeans your sibling. No matter how poor or unattractive your brother is, he is your brother. Even the secular world recognizes this and acknowledges that blood is thicker than water. The Bible even says it better that all Christians are one body of Christ and “If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together” (1 Cor. 12:26).

Second, no one can deny that the USA is more wealthy and powerful than the countries of Africa. I have often confessed it to my brothers and sisters from the USA that the Lord has blessed their country with many material blessings. There are many opportunities of personal advancement and growth in America. Life is more comfortable and easier in many ways in the USA. This is the Lord’s doing and should not make American Christians accept the tendency to look down upon Africa. “What do you have that you did not receive? If then you received it, why do you boast as if you did not receive it?” (1 Cor. 4:7).

Third, consider the Christian testimony in Africa. An unconditional support of the president’s remarks has serious implications for evangelism more especially among Moslem communities in Africa. In many Moslem strongholds, people are told that what they see in the West, more especially, in America is what Christianity stands for. To many in these places, America is a Christian nation and everything that people do or say in America is what the Bible teaches. Now, guess what will the Muslim say. “Christianity believes that Africa is the most unpleasant place in the world.” Of course not all people will believe that, praise the Lord for his grace. But if one person finds the president’s remarks a stumbling broke to believe in Christ just because some Christians did not condemn and distance themselves from the remarks, we ought to be greatly concerned for that soul.

Again, let me reiterate that not all Christians have unconditionally supported the President’s remarks and I am thankful for that. A Sunday following the reporting of what the president said, one of my pastors came to me after the service and said, “How do you feel about what our president said?” I told him that I was hurt and I felt my eyes warming up with tears as I spoke to him. He then said to me, “I am sorry. I know…It’s hurtful. But I don’t think of you or your country that way, my brother.” He then put his arm around my shoulders and said, “You are my brother forever.” Oh, what a comfort it was to hear those words and know that there are still brothers and sisters who care for this brother from the so-called unpleasant continent.

“You are my brother forever,” that’s is very true. Here on earth, God has made us to live in different parts of the planet as Paul points out, “And he made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth, having determined allotted periods and the boundaries of their dwelling place, 27that they should seek God, and perhaps feel their way toward him and find him. Yet he is actually not far from each one of us,” (Acts 17:26-27). But a day is coming when all the boundaries will be abolished and as one family in Christ we will live together forever.

 

 

 

 

 

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6 thoughts on “A Lament: Why I feel betrayed by my fellow Christians who support disparaging remarks of Africa and Africans

  1. You are my brother forever, too, Confex. Sadly, many people do not realize the far-reaching implications of supporting and defending every action and word of the President simply because he’s “our guy.” We are to test the words of men against the light of Scripture and the truth of the gospel, not against party lines. Some things are simply indefensible and it is improper to twist and bend it into a good thing.

  2. “I am sorry. I know…It’s hurtful. But I don’t think of you or your country that way, my brother.” He then put his arm around my shoulders and said, “You are my brother forever.” Oh, what a comfort it was to hear those words and know that there are still brothers and sisters who care for this brother from the so-called unpleasant continent.
    Yes to the above-I have so many dear Christian friends who are leaders in Africa like Confex.please support this Godly man because Confex is God’s man in Christ.
    Love you brother!
    Rev. Bruce R. Kuiper

  3. Masauko Dick says:

    Brother Makhalira you have spoken Mmm I feel better now but I was hurt by the language which was used by the president of USA

    Thanks for the words of wisdom

    Massa

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